Hal Fischer's exhibition features in our round-up of must-see photography in December 2019

Must-see photography in December 2019

Welcome to our round-up of must-see photography in December 2019.

Our final round-up of the year includes a major retrospective of Dora Maar and works by American artist Hal Fischer.

Bloomberg New Contemporaries 2019

Bloomberg New Contemporaries returns to the South London Gallery with an exhibition of works by 45 emerging artists.

Work will be presented across the Main Gallery and Fire Station.

A guest panel comprising artists Rana Begum, Sonia Boyce and Ben Rivers selected 45 participants from more than 1,500 applications to the annual open-submission exhibition.

The show marks the 70th anniversary of New Contemporaries.

Since 1949 New Contemporaries has played a vital part in the story of contemporary British art, reflecting and responding to developments in artistic practice, and supporting artists.

Selected artists include: Jan Agha, Roland Carline, Liam Ashley Clark, Samuel Fordham, Elena Helfrecht, Paul Jex, Jonas Pequeno, Stefania Zocco and many more.

Bloomberg New Contemporaries 2019, South London Gallery, until February 23, 2020.

A group of men sit around the table. Part of our round-up of must-see photography in December 2019
Capturing the Crawshays: Family photographs from 1855-1879
Picture courtesy of Cyfarthfa Castle Museum and Art Gallery

Capturing the Crawshays: Family photographs from 1855-1879

This exhibition at Cyfarthfa Castle Museum and Art Gallery contains many never-exhibited photographs of the iron-master Crawshay family.

The photographs date from 1855 to 1879.

They are a mixture of unique family portraits and landscapes forming two distinct collections.

The first is part of the permanent collection at Cyfarthfa Castle Museum and Art Gallery.

It features photographs taken by Robert Thompson Crawshay at his studio in Cyfarthfa Castle – the castellated family manor house of the Merthyr Tydfil Iron Masters – between 1866 and 1879.

The second is a collection on loan from the Crawshay family.

Capturing the Crawshays: Family photographs from 1855-1879, Cyfarthfa, until March 1, 2020.

Dora Maar's Untitled Hand-Shell image as featured in our round-up of must-see photography in December 2019
Dora Maar, 1907-1997, Untitled (Hand-Shell) 1934,
Centre Pompidou, Musée national d’art moderne, Paris
Photo © Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI, Dist. RMN-Grand Palais / image Centre Pompidou, MNAM-CCI © ADAGP, Paris and DACS, London 2019

Dora Maar

Tate Modern presents the first UK retrospective of the work of Dora Maar.

Maar’s provocative photographs and montages became celebrated icons of surrealism.

This exhibition features more than 200 works from a career spanning more than six decades.

It shows how Maar’s eye for the unusual also translated to her commercial commissions, social documentary photographs, and paintings – key aspects of her practice which have, until now, remained little known.

Beginning with her early commissioned work, it travels through her street photography, her relationship with Pablo Picasso, her largely undocumented years and finally a substantial group of camera-less photographs that she made in the 1980s.

Dora Maar, Tate Modern, until March 15, 2020.

Gay Semiotics Handkerchiefs. Part of our round-up of must-see photography in December 2019
Gay Semiotics Handkerchiefs © Hal Fischer, courtesy of GoMA

Hal Fischer, Gay Semiotics and other works

Photographic works by American artist Hal Fischer are on display for the first time in Scotland.

Fischer photographed the gay male culture of San Francisco in the later 1970s.

The exhibition features Gay Semiotics, along with two related works: Boy-Friends and 18th near Castro St. x 24.

Fischer utilizes critical theory, text, and a tongue-in-cheek approach to his subject.

Gay Semiotics, Boy-Friends and 18th near Castro St. x 24 are related serial works investigating urban gay life during the first decade of gay liberation.

Fischer’s work reflects a brief period of time between the Stonewall uprising of 1969 and the early 1980s advent of AIDS.

It is a celebration of identity and community.

Since 1977 – when the first exhibition of these works took place in San Francisco – Gay Semiotics has been recognised as a unique and pioneering analysis of a gay historical vernacular.

Hal Fischer, Gay Semiotics and other works, Gallery of Modern Art (GoMA), until May 30, 2020.

Main image: Hal Fischer at GoMA, courtesy of GoMA

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